The Toybox

people for the conservation of limited amounts of indignation


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books: anne of green gables et al
children of dune - leto 1
seperis
Still favorites. I always liked them for combining both the most romantic and best parts of nineteeth/early twentieth century small towns and communities with realistic assessments of what they were like; loving something without glazing it in impossible idealism. It always makes me more than a little amused when people talk about the nuclear family and it's singularity and above-all-ness; I can't imagine it working at any point in history when community was so necessary to survival, much less social interaction.

It also reminds me it's a fairly modern luxury to be able to socialize only with people you like; I'm not entirely sure, when reading, whether it's altogether a good thing. Being able to restrict your social interactions that much, and quickly eliminate on the basis of not quite simpatico instead of required social interaction means never really developing both the ability to get along with people and also miss the opportunity to know people who make take time and effort and skill to deal with, and I'm pretty sure it's worth the effort.

It was also a hell of a lot harder to end a friendship when you are pretty much going to see them forever until you die at every social event; that's pretty good motivation to get over yourself and move on and fix what you can--which surprisingly isn't as hard as it sounds. I like happy endings, though.

Anne of Windy Poplars is both my least and most favorite depending on mood; I'm not a huge fan of epistolary writing at the best of times, and I always manage to forget that it's the eternal exception to the rules. Her letters to Gilbert are always hilarious, and I always faintly wish there'd been a volume of his to her; he always struck me as one to have just as many odd adventures and fall into as many odd scrapes.

Currently at Anne's House of Dreams. I skipped about a bit to get to my favorite bits, and Miss Cornelia is not be missed.

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Siiiiigh. God, I love those books. Just reading about you reading them made me happy. :)

I got my first copies at the mall while shopping with my grandmother at the age of, I think, twelve. Never looked back. I like the author's other ones--especially Chronicles of Avonlea and The Story Girl--but none like these.

I tore through the Anne series last week! I agree with you; I always wished there was a book from Gilbert's POV. I would've loved to see his perspective more in general; he seemed like he had such a sense of humor.

Miss Cornelia is fantastic. During and after I finished the series, occasionally her pet phrases would pop up into my head (usually "Isn't that just like a _____") and her first meeting with Anne and Gilbert was lovely.

I don't typically like books like these (give me explosions and magical explosions, please) but Anne of Green Gables + sequels just had this charm to them.

Oh, Gilbert's POV would have been marvelous.

Miss Cornelia is fantastic. During and after I finished the series, occasionally her pet phrases would pop up into my head (usually "Isn't that just like a _____") and her first meeting with Anne and Gilbert was lovely.

I just tread that part last night!

Oh Anne. *happy sigh* I love these so much.

I have to admit, when I read these the first time (maybe about the same time as you did?), my reading comprehension was pretty damn good, and yet I almost still missed the main (sad) event of House o' Dreams; it was so very hidden in the language and I didn't have my 19th Century decoder ring. (Trying to be suitable vague so as not to spoil folks.) But god, I was in floods of tears at the end of Green Gables.

Also. I have to ask the obvious question - you do know that there is a book 7 & 8? I discovered these by a sheer fluke.

I also have a soft spot for Emily series.

Trufax, I pick up so much more now than I did on original reading, which feels kind of appropriate; I like that as an adult I can see it's not all idealism and romance and perfect; between the lines is legions of stuff I wasn't old enough (or experienced enough) to understand, much less think critically about.

when I read these the first time (maybe about the same time as you did?), my reading comprehension was pretty damn good, and yet I almost still missed the main (sad) event of House o' Dreams; it was so very hidden in the language and I didn't have my 19th Century decoder ring
OMG ME TOO! =/

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She made teacher sound like the best thing ever. (I wanted to grow up and go to Queens for years. Not even being Canadian, I had many nifty plans for this.)

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