The Toybox

people for the conservation of limited amounts of indignation


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leveson inquiry - the continuing adventures
children of dune - leto 1
seperis
My day is being day-like.

Leveson Inquiry

The Leveson Inquiry, link to main page and all current information. Phone Hacking, link to main page and all current information.

James Murdoch did not read the Neville email, merely, you know, answered it. This is like Billie Jean, where Billie Jean is a forwarded email with the words "nightmare scenario" and "Unfortunately it is as bad as we feared," being thrown around. I am saying, I understand. I, too, answer email without reading it, especially when it looks vaguely important and uses terminology that may or may not imply I (my company) are terribly, terribly fucked.

Here's the thing that makes me sad. If he's telling the truth, honest to God, this is the man you want running your company? He doesn't read email with alarmist adjectives. What, an email THERE IS A GIANT BEAR THAT IS GOING TO EAT YOUR ENTIRE STAFF IN FIVE MINUTES and he'll be "Cool, call me" not aware the person will be eaten in four minutes fifty-five seconds due to that not reading thing.

Yes, I find this comforting that a multibillion dollar company is being run by or run with the efforts of someone who fails either at lying or basic literacy.

Napoleon

Napolean Bonaparte in history is not like, a subject that isn't fairly well covered. I mean, I know my dates, my island, and my Wellington. But weirdly--very weirdly, come to think--it was reading a goddamn romance novel (two actually, Roberta Gellis and Georgette Heyer, but moreso with Roberta) that belatedly made me realize how utterly terrifying he was to Europe and how borderline close he came to a really early unification of Europe. I don't know if it was my perception in history classes (and I took a lot of history classes and spent a lot of my late teens/early twenties hitting the Dewey decimal history section like a really disorganized storm of curiosity) or my selections, but the emphasis on his military ability and his vision and his unification of France and his conquering and his exile didn't quite ever get beyond the genius conqueror and into the fact that he was actually goddamn terrifying in his ambitions and more importantly, was brilliant enough at what he did to fulfill those ambitions.

ETA: So that was odd in the posting.

Posted at Dreamwidth: http://seperis.dreamwidth.org/119442.html. | You can reply here or there. | comment count unavailable comments

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ETA: So that was odd in the posting.
I was wondering...

I have recently been learning more about the Conquistadors and you know? I know I learned this stuff in school. But they failed to press home how 90% of the population of the Americas died within fifty years. Or how the Conquistadors just went into civilizations hundreds of years old and dismantled them. The magnitude of what happened--kind of glossed over.

Yeah, I had a paragraph there that I must have erased and I couldn't remember all of it, so I removed the sentence altogether.

I have recently been learning more about the Conquistadors and you know? I know I learned this stuff in school. But they failed to press home how 90% of the population of the Americas died within fifty years. Or how the Conquistadors just went into civilizations hundreds of years old and dismantled them. The magnitude of what happened--kind of glossed over.

The glossing over of that part of history, especially pre-Mayflower, is so complete it's actually a shock to realize later when reading how many people and civilizations were lost and how fast it happened.


"1491" by James Mann is an excellent excellent book about what life was like in the Americas before Columbus and company rolled in. And how said rolling in had its effects. Cannot recommend it more highly. And it's surprisingly not very depressing.

I actually reviewed that book when it came out (back when I was doing book reviews)! A very good book, yes. And it keeps popping up lately in totally unrelated places--like my brother's Christmas wish list.

What I'm listening to now are a more general series of lectures on the conquest--some focusing on native cultures, but a lot focusing on the European side. I'm just still boggled by the fact that in school, it's like Columbus blah blah Pilgrims! As one of my friends pointed out, yes, we do learn about horrible things done to Native Americans, but they're horrible things done to Native Americans in the westward expansion of the nineteenth century. Which, let's face it, was peanuts compared to the fifty years after 1492.

The latest twist in HackGate has basically blown my mind. So...James Murdoch is really and truly sticking to the, "I'm not corrupt, I'm just incompetent" defense? And he thinks this is going to work? Really? And it's just...this is the supposed heir to the Murdoch empire. This was supposed to be the guy! And he either can't read, or he is the shittiest liar ever.

I think at this point he's not even caring about the fact that he's a self declared illiterate. Right now it's all about staying out of prison. Here's hoping he doesn't pull off that feat.

Napoleon, the dude who gave the entirety of Europe last names and created the civil code we still basically use today. Er, yeah, I too know more technical stuff about him than actually what it would have been like. History class, you're doing it wrong.

Haven't gotten to that bit of the Leveson Inquiry yet (am so far behind, srsly) but it sounds utterly laughable and yet not funny because this shit actually happened. (Kind of like Paul McMullan's testimony -- alternately a bad comedy or seriously cringeworthy because someone thinks that way.)

Ah, Napoleon. Really, at the time he loomed Hitler-like in the eyes of the European leaders fighting him. Scary as hell!

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